A Slightly Different Angled Ridge Line Was Given To Each Home In This Passive House Development

ADC on August 22, 2023
A collection of modern homes feature unique angled roof lines, a clear-finished white cedar siding on the upper volume, and a painted siding made from materials recovered from manufacturing by-products on the lower volume.

RODE, a Boston-based team of architects, designers, and urban planners, together with Passive House Construction LLC, has shared photos of Brucewood Homes, a collection of internationally certified Passive House single-family homes.

A collection of modern homes feature unique angled roof lines, a clear-finished white cedar siding on the upper volume, and a painted siding made from materials recovered from manufacturing by-products on the lower volume.

The Brucewood Homes project is a series of three homes, that have a contemporary design that reflects its neighborhood context.

A modern home features an angled roof line, a clear-finished white cedar siding on the upper volume, and a painted siding made from materials recovered from manufacturing by-products on the lower volume.

The exterior materials on each of the homes include clear-finished white cedar siding on the upper volume and painted siding made from materials recovered from manufacturing by-products on the lower volume.

A modern home features an angled roof line, a clear-finished white cedar siding on the upper volume, and a painted siding made from materials recovered from manufacturing by-products on the lower volume.

Although each home is almost identical, they are slightly different as they each feature a unique angled ridge line. The homes were sited carefully to minimize the amount of rock ledge and mature trees that needed to be removed and maximize the solar gain through the full-height south-facing windows.

A modern home features an angled roof line, a clear-finished white cedar siding on the upper volume, and a painted siding made from materials recovered from manufacturing by-products on the lower volume.

Wood louvers showcased on the wood-plank upper facade and control the light entering the central living/dining space. The louvers also direct solar gain, reflect harsh summer sunlight to keep the interior cool and admit lower winter sun to be held in the thermal mass of the house’s concrete slab.

Wood louvers showcased on the wood-plank upper facade and control the light entering the central living/dining space.

Inside, the main social areas of the home are open plan, with the living room, dining area, and kitchen sharing the space. Large sections of windows allow natural light to filter through to the interior.

A modern home with an open-plan interior with concrete floor.
A modern home with an open-plan interior with concrete floor.
A modern wood kitchen with dark countertops, an island, and concrete flooring.

Wood and steel stairs connect the social areas with the private rooms located above.

Wood and steel stairs connect the social areas with the private rooms located above.

Upstairs, warmth has been added to the space with wood floors, while the black door frames complement the stair railing and the window frames on the opposite wall.

A modern home has black door frames that complement the stair railing and the window frames on the opposite wall.
Photography by RODE Architects

Source: Contemporist